Diary thoughts

Everything Stops for Wimbledon

tennis

 

I enjoy Wimbledon and I am not ashamed to admit it. Whilst I dont always get to watch every game I watch as much as I can. I used to enjoy playing and was in the junior team at school but then ponies took over and took to squash instead. Sadly I don’t play either of these games today but maybe one day. I still have my squash racket which will probably snap from lack of use.

Whilst I shall have to do all my major chores in the morning and after dark I will still be able to knit and do my embroidery whilst watching. And there is always the pause button so I can make tea! and the mute button to shut the commentators up while they make up things to say.

A major sufferer of hay fever it will give my breathing tubes a break from the garden.

I do feel sorry for people who don’t enjoy sport (I am not a football fan) because this time of year the television is swamped with it. But it is a break from all the terrible things that are happening in our world.

So like sport or not enjoy the next few weeks either in the garden or sat in front of the idiot box.

 

Expressions and Phrases Inherited from Others.

Everyone has family sayings and phrases passed down through the generations. Many are repeated through the years without knowing where they came from. I was reminded of this when walking the dog the other morning, in the road there was a squirrel that had been knocked down by a car, and I recalled a friend who always referred to them as Mickeys and for ever after that is what they had been called.
As a family we have many passed down from ancient relatives one favourite is “I’ll have that little bit Ivy” an elderly aunt would save something on the edge of her plate but her brother would lean across with his fork and steal it. She never learnt or maybe she was amused by it.
When I shared a house some years ago with a friend we had all kinds of silly sayings. The postman was known as the poleeman and the dishwasher as the washdisher. If you were ever finding it difficult with doing something or changed your mind about going anywhere my fathers saying of ” you would come, you said you could do it.” Would bring a laugh. Or for a failure “hey ho skiddly.” And his favourite ” I know you want it but do you need it?”

The father of a lady acquaintance said he would get in the car to go somewhere and state “forward the colour is blue,” nobody in the family knew why it was blue.

Like family stories to make sure sayings are not lost use them often so your family character can continue. There are so many in our family there are too many to mention here, but I would love to hear back from anyone else who finds the family sayings a lot of fun.

Peggy Grayson ‘A Door to All My Rooms’ now on Kindle

Fascinating step back into the past in the Berkshire Countryside.

Storm Grayson

A Door to All My Rooms

by Peggy Grayson

A Door to All My Rooms is an affectionate and nostalgic tour of a much-loved childhood home, rekindling memories of the characters who peopled it, some sad, some very funny.

Invaluable as a piece of social history, this is a fascinating step back into the past, providing an amusing insight into family life in the Berkshire countryside of the 20’s and 30’s.

Accustomed as we are nowadays to the machinery of modern living it seems incredible that people lived civilised lives without telephones, refrigeration, TV or central heating.  How did people fill their time and cope?  Read this and find out.

The author, who has been writing since childhood, is an International Championship Judge of dogs and ponies and contributes a highly popular weekly column to the dog press as well as writing extensively for other journals.

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Grannies Little Adventure

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At 94 it is not as easy to do things you did when were 64. So anything you do is an adventure.

When we had a sunny day this week I summoned up my courage to go and sit in the garden, with the help of my trusty Zimmer frame and my daughter I managed to get over the step from the conservatory onto the patio. I have always preferred being outside rather than being stuck inside. But now at my age I spend most of my time confined to the bungalow as I am not able to get about as I did and certainly I am now no longer allowed to go anywhere without somebody with me as I have been known to topple over and everyone is afraid I will do it again – surprisingly I no longer bounce when I hit the deck.

I have always loved my garden and up until a couple of years ago managed to grow my vegetables and keep it reasonably up together. So it makes me very sad that I can no longer do it. A while ago they came and fitted grab handles in the doorway and railings so I can now get down the step and safely onto the lawn, so it takes me a long time just to get outside.

Once I had got onto the patio Zimmer trundled along to the steps down to the lawn but once on the lawn Zimmers wheels were reluctant to rotate. But I still managed to make it to the chair and had a lovely time enjoying the garden and the warm sunshine. My daughter does her best to keep the garden in check but its not the same as doing it yourself.

A World Less Familiar in 100 years.

old street

 

As age creeps up on us things around us change and not always for the better we often feel. When you have lived nearly a century the changes are unfathomable.

 

A hundred years ago:

Health
From 1911-5, 63% of people died before the age of 60.
Now, only 12% die before the age of 60.

The composition of the workforce has changed.
Now, 1 in 3 are professionals or managers, compared to 1 in 7 in
1911.

In 1901 there were 1,093,000 births and 632,000 deaths. By the
year 2021 the number of births and deaths, projected in 1996, is
expected to be 695,000 and 647,000 respectively.

Since 1901, more people have emigrated from the UK than
immigrated. By 1997, a net exodus from the UK of 15,600,000
had occurred.

Between 1900 and 1998 the housing stock of Great Britain has
increased from about 7 million to 22 million permanent
dwellings.

In 1901 the average prison population was 15,900. By 1998 the
figure had increased to 65,300. There were more prisoners in
1998 than in any other year this century.

In 1926 there were 1,715,000 motor vehicles registered and
4,886 road fatalities, giving a ratio of 2.9 fatalities per thousand
vehicles. The Second World War interrupts the general
downward trend of the ratio. Between 1939 and 1944 the
number of motor vehicles registered fell by 49% while the
number of fatalities remained relatively stable, leading to a rise
in the ratio to 4.0 in 1944. By 1997, the number of motor
vehicles registered increased to 26,974,000 but the number of
fatalities fell to 3,599. Thus, the ratio of fatalities per one
thousand motor vehicles fell to 0.1.

In 1935 the
Road Traffic Census Report records a 24-hour count
of traffic at 467 roadside points. The average number of
‘mechanically-propelled’ vehicles to pass any predetermined
point was recorded as 11 per hour. By 1954 the Road Traffic
Census Report records the average number of vehicles to pass
had risen to 159 per hour.

Between 1955 and 1998 total motor
vehicle traffic increased by almost 500% with growth in traffic
since 1988 up by 22%

In 1904 a Royal Commission studied traffic in London. The
speeds of various vehicles were taken. During off-peak periods a
motor driven cab would travel at an average of 12 miles per
hour. In the post-war period traffic speeds were slower. In 1996
the average off-peak vehicle speed was recorded as 10 miles per
hour.
The first woman to be elected to the House of Commons was
Countess Constance Markievicz in 1918, although, as a member
of Sinn Fein, she did not take her seat and so is not included as
an MP in this context

Between 1900 and 1999 retail prices have risen by around 66
times at an average annual rate of some 4.3%.

There has beena marked contrast between the two halves of the Century.
Between 1949 and 1999 prices rose some 19 fold at an average
rate of 6.0% compared to a 3½ fold increase between 1900 and
1949 at an average rate of 2.6%.

The purchasing power of a pound fell from £1 in 1900 to the
equivalent of just 1.5 pence in 1999.

Typical prices:
1900 to 1999
Inland letter post 1d (0.4p) 26p
The Times 3d (1.2p) 35p
Pint of beer in a public bar 2d (0.8p) £1.73
Pint of fresh milk (London) 2d (0.8p) 26p
Dozen new laid eggs (London) 1/4½d (6.9p) £1.57

Some really interesting facts, which doesn’t take into account the rise in Information technology, the television and radio growth.

(These statistics came from a Parliamentary White paper 15 years ago so can you imagine the difference now?)

As recently as Forty years ago these were invented, can you believe it?

  • 1972: The first video game console, used primarily for playing video games on a TV, is the Magnavox Odyssey.[164]
  • 1973: The first commercial graphical user interface was introduced in 1973 on the Xerox Alto. The modern GUI was later popularized by theXerox Star and Apple Lisa.
  • 1975: Altair 8800 was the spark that ignited the microcomputer revolution.
  • 1973-75: The Internet protocol suite was developed by Vinton Cerf and Robert E. Kahn for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) ARPANET, creating the basis for the modern Internet.

1980s

  • 1982: A CD-ROM (/ˌsˌdˈrɒm/, an acronym of “Compact Disc Read-only memory”) is a pre-pressed compact disc that contains dataaccessible to, but not writable by, a computer for data storage and music playback. The 1985 Yellow Book standard developed by Sonyand Philips adapted the format to hold any form of binary data.[165]
  • 1990:The World Wide Web was first introduced to the public by English engineer and computer scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee..[166] [167]
  • 1993: MOSAIC, the first popular web browser is introduced
  • 1995: DVD is an optical disc storage format, invented and developed by Philips, Sony, Toshiba, and Panasonic in 1995. DVDs offer higher storage capacity than Compact Discs while having the same dimensions.

I thought a blog of information and statistics would make a change from my usual bla bla bla!

Useful visitors

I was lucky enough to have one of my chosen brothers to stay last week end. I don’t see him nearly enough as he lives up North. Luckily he was down South judging dogs in Devon so there was no excuse not to stop by. We have no spare room at my mothers but he is happy to kip on the sofa.
I have been cataloguing my mothers dog books which are numerous so his help was greatly appreciated and we managed to complete the task. I now only have the sporting books to do which are many.
It was nice for my mother as he has been a family friend for a long time and they have a great deal in common.
The house is quiet now he has left to go back up North but I am sure we will see him again soon.
This week my task is to teach my new program Dragon speaking so it will be quicker than typing(some hopes).

People We Pass Along The Way

Just checking you didn’t miss it1

Storm Grayson

How many of us ponder the people we pass along life’s path. Whatever direction that is taken we mix with a variety of different people. From nursery school (or in my case kindergarten) and childhood friends, to teenage escapades to college or university and that’s before going to work. There are family members that come and go, either elderly relatives who pass away or ones that simply just disappear. Out of all the connections made with people it is only a small number that stay with us through life.

As one grows older our criteria changes when it comes to friends, because that’s when we realise we need good friends who will stick by you and not turn away when a crisis happens or advice is needed. How many friends can you count that you still know from the age of say 10? here I am talking real friends not…

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People We Pass Along The Way

How many of us ponder the people we pass along life’s path. Whatever direction that is taken we mix with a variety of different people. From nursery school (or in my case kindergarten) and childhood friends, to teenage escapades to college or university and that’s before going to work. There are family members that come and go, either elderly relatives who pass away or ones that simply just disappear. Out of all the connections made with people it is only a small number that stay with us through life.

As one grows older our criteria changes when it comes to friends, because that’s when we realise we need good friends who will stick by you and not turn away when a crisis happens or advice is needed. How many friends can you count that you still know from the age of say 10? here I am talking real friends not those you would class as ongoing acquaintances. With real friends you don’t have to talk every day or even every month but you know they are there and when you meet up or pick up the phone its as if you saw them only yesterday.

During a working life particularly if you have had different careers or jobs you come across all walks of life, good and bad. And how about all those people you met in your teenage years going to clubs and parties.  Varied  interests conjures up different people, many long forgotten. But like dreams you can be minding your own business and suddenly someone who you hadn’t thought about or seen in decades suddenly comes to mind, giving cause to remember the good or maybe the bad times.

So just sit and think how many people have touched your life so far, hundreds, thousands or millions? Its a thought!

 

This Week in 1986

Re-blogging as originally done from my tablet which seemed to have had a hitch!

Storm Grayson

Watching the snooker world championship this week reminds me as it does every year of my appendix!
I had been suffering with a rumbling appendix on and off for some years and by April of 1986 I had lost three stone in weight looked yellow and could barely keep down a glass of water. I had a dog grooming parlour at the time and luckily my mother lived nearby so was able to hold the fort.
My Dr became quite exasperated with the consultant eventually sending me in as an emergency. Although not that long ago Hereford hospital was still a series of large nissen huts, mixed wards of what I remember at least twenty beds.  One of my vivid memories is of a lady having an asthma attack, now when I can’t be bothered to take my meds for asthma I remember what I saw.
My mother has a…

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This Week in 1986

Watching the snooker world championship this week reminds me as it does every year of my appendix!
I had been suffering with a rumbling appendix on and off for some years and by April of 1986 I had lost three stone in weight looked yellow and could barely keep down a glass of water. I had a dog grooming parlour at the time and luckily my mother lived nearby so was able to hold the fort.
My Dr became quite exasperated with the consultant eventually sending me in as an emergency. Although not that long ago Hereford hospital was still a series of large nissen huts, mixed wards of what I remember at least twenty beds.  One of my vivid memories is of a lady having an asthma attack, now when I can’t be bothered to take my meds for asthma I remember what I saw.
My mother has a horror of hospitals as her generation only equates them with death and informed me she would not come to visit. My father on the other hand came every day being a frustrated Doctor and husband managed to visit also.
I was there two weeks as they were not satisfied it was my appendix so made a very large incision with lots of stitches. But I managed to enjoy the whole snooker tournament in the day room while I knitted a white aran sweater.
Silly the things you remember.

As I write this I am laid low with the cough that’s making the rounds and enjoying the snooker all those past players are now commentators and the new generation of players look so young!

Check Out the Writing and Needlework Pages

At last I have started to fill out my blog pages. I have now added some text to the writing pages and there is a short story and a poem so far. Hopefully more will follow. I have also added the next stage of the cross-stitch I am doing. This week I managed to get a knitting pattern I have been looking for and I purposely only bought the pattern! Have a look and click the links to the updated pages. More to Follow

Hitting a Bump in the Road!

My father always said ‘strive on you have all eternity to rest’. It was his favourite saying and he meant every word. I don’t know where it came from but as he was an actor it was probably from a play he did, I don’t think it was Shakespeare but would be interested to know if anyone can enlighten me. I am my fathers daughter and like to fill every minute doing something and feeling worthy. I also inherited multi-tasking from my maternal grandmother as I can sit and watch the television, eat my supper, embroider or knit and read the newspaper all at the same time. She, bless her could drink brandy suck a mac cough sweet and smoke an un-tipped Players cigarette as well. She lived to 94 so one of these must have kept her going.

As a family we have always been busy and a day with no accomplishments makes a worrying bump in the road. This past winter has caused a bit of a one  with long grey and never ending wet days. I am sure I am not alone with feeling wearisome and down in the dumps. But thankfully now although chilly the days are longer and the sun is not afraid to shine.

Business is inclined to go quiet between The New Year and early Spring which is another little bump, but it seems the road is beginning to smooth itself out.

I am at an age like many of my friends querying whether to keep on keeping on or take the bus pass (while its still available). However I am a person as I have said earlier who needs to be busy and feel useful so I shall keep on keeping on until the wheels wont go over the bump in the road any longer.

 

The Single Life

Listening to the Sandy Posey song recently and also having been contacted by a magazine about living as a single woman I thought I would do a bit of musing here!

Although I have been married twice and have had some long term relationships I have also been single for a fair amount of time. Some people become desperate at being on their own, they become depressed, frightened and feel worthless. But then there are the others who relish being on their own to do what and when they want without having to consult anyone else. I fall in the latter category.

There are obviously downsides to being a singleton but most can be overcome. Learning a bit of DIY, being able to change a plug and a light bulb are always useful. I am not a reader of manuals so can figure out a few things. I am known for my techi abilities so helping out with DVD players, and new phones is the norm.

I have laid carpets, fitted a kitchen and in my younger days before computer engines I was quite a useful mechanic. Flat pack furniture – no problem.

The big downside can be socialising, its great for girlie lunches or helping with parties but its not so good if you want to go down the pub or out to a restaurant. Sitting on your own can attract attention and not always the welcome kind.

When I was interviewed for the magazine I was asked if I would like to get married again, well to be truthful no, but you must never say never. To have a nice man to go out to dinner with, go to the theatre and maybe some travel would be nice but the nearest he can live is next door!

I like my own space and can sympathise with the heroine of a book I have just read who wanted to get away from everyone and be on her own.

Out of date and out of Fashion!

I am not referring specifically to myself here. Although what prompted my title was the fact I am sniffing on a bottle of Olbas Oil which is thirteen years out of date. It still smells the same and still makes me sneeze! Before I took over my mothers kitchen the cupboards were full of things pre 2000. In particular the spices and herbs. As for the fridge well there where a few green jackets. I could blame it on her lack of sight but then I am not so sure as its not something new.

What is fashion? is it something we all like at the time or is it what the media tell us is popular. Everything it seems comes full circle including flowery material, mini skirts and bell bottoms. If only we could keep the same weight and shape through life we would always be in ‘fashion’.

 

Time, Garden and My Week.

Another chance to read.

Storm Grayson

Here we are at the weekend again, where does time go? I am sure like me you can remember how time dragged at school and we were always told that as you get older everything speeds up, did we believe it? no we didn’t. I used to put it down to the fact I lived by my diary and in my business everything happened in six weekly chunks. But not now, I pack as much as I can into my week but there is always a little bit left over.

Now with the weather hopefully improving I can add the garden to my weekly duties but after being stung by a queen wasp this last week I don’t mind if I leave it all a bit longer. We have a very helpful neighbour but sadly he only does half the job so making more work. He had an idea we…

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Looking Alike, Angela Lansbury Interview.

Just in case you missed it.

Storm Grayson

I recently read an interview with Angela Lansbury. It was most interesting and I admire her for the variety of work she has done both on the stage, television and in film. As many other people I am sure I just loved her in ‘Murder she Wrote’. I was horrified to read they had thought of resurrecting it with a new lead actress. Like so many good series with convincing leads it would have been disappointing to us older viewers. I am sure I am not alone in thinking all these remakes don’t quite hit the spot and in fact I probably only watch one episode if its on television and then don’t bother after that.

My father was an actor and mentioned appearing on stage with Angela Lansbury in the early days and I know I have a picture somewhere. But what most amused and interested me was when…

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Early Bird

 

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‘An early bird catches the worm!’ Eugh I hope not.

Up and at it early this morning as domestics to do in double quick time so I can head out to a customer in Oxfordshire this morning. And things in the diary for the next couple of weeks. Including my first Networking meeting with the lovely ladies of ‘I am Woman’ in Swindon. It will be my first evening out for four months so a double plus.

Yesterdays sunshine made all the difference to me and I feel a little more motivated. About time I would say. The winter has gone on far too long for all of us and its now time to hunt for the green shoots of spring.

The daffodils are about to come out in the garden and our neighbours have crocus on their lawn.

As a friends father used to say ‘Forward the colour is Blue!’  (don’t ask me why.)